Registered Charity Number: 1037414

Blackwell Colliery (first Site) also known as A Winning Minewater Treatment Site.

December 4th, 2017 in News by admin

The colliery opened in 1871 and closed in 1969. The shafts were not filled as there was a need to remove water from the workings to protect other producing collieries down dip from inundation by water draining through the older near outcropping seams to the west.

1886

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The mine was 15 years in operation at the time of the survey and was linked to the main railway line by a mineral haulage line. The stream (Normanton Brook) appears to have been little altered from its original course at this time.

1898

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The Normanton Brook shows signs of human activity and its bankside is the location of the magazine (used for storage of charges for developing the coalface). Blackwell sidings had been established along with an engine shed. A southern rail link to the main line railway has been established.

1913

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The stream has been developed with the bankside overshadowed by a spoil heap on its northern bank. The sidings have been developed further

1938

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The mineral railway has been exstended to two new collieries to the east of A Winning, The first being the second site of Blackwell Colliery whilst the old site kept the name A Winning Colliery. The second new colliery being New Hucknell. An aerial ropeway has been established from the A Winning site to take spoil to the new tip across the valley. Four sewage treatment works are discharging to the Normanton Brook above A Winning. The three collieries pumped face drainage water was also being drained to the stream along with surface water.

1967

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The Normanton Brook shows signs of straightening and other engineered changes to its course. The southern spoil heap has developed to near its final proportions.

1977

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The Normanton Brook with an added added loop of drainage dyke which curves round by the railway line. The railway sidings have declined and the engine shed has been removed. The winding hose and the shaft building are present as is what appears to be a lagoon to the south of the brook which is likely to be the first settling pond taking mine pumping water before discharge to the stream. To the south of the brook and towards the railway there appears to have been some industrial development that affected the landscape.

1985

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Little apparent change to the landscape or the brook

2017

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The Normanton Brook is shown in poor detail but the minewater treatment lagoons belonging to the Cal Authority are shown in detail.

Discussion.

Further work is needed to understand the landscape around the A Winning site. The ground form and condition of the land is of a degraded nature towards the south of the railway course and demonstrates the signs of small scale opencast operations.

The elevated chloride levels present in the Normanton Brook are not found to lesson with distance from the A Winning minewater treatment site discharge as there are other point and diffuse chloride feeds to the brook.

H Wood 3rd December 2017

Follow Up.

follow up1 Looking north across the valley to Blackwell in the background. Coal has been worked extensively in this valley, predominately from Blackwell ‘A’ Winning Colliery, which was situated in the field opposite and closed in the 1960s. Permission has been granted for the removal of half-a-million tonnes of coal over two years from the valley. The coal is transported out via rail to a new Westhouses junction (two to three trains per week). Once complete, the valley will be landscaped for wildlife conservation and the existing cycle path will be extended westwards (the Blackwell trail).

 

follow up 22. Opencast mining on the south side of the Normanton Brook towards Blackwell and Westhouses Station. The engine shed seen on many of the maps is still standing. Blackwell Colliery was still operational or just prior to demolition, (background left the coal washery is visible) so likely 1968.

3 Minutes of Blackwell Parish Council (4th June 2011) notes that the last opencast (Engine Reclamation) restoration of the valley would be completed by June 2012.

 

Comment.

The valley of the Normanton Brook has been opencast and deep mined from earliest times. The valley has been left in a highly degraded state with poor land drainage and soil qualities. The restoration has left a poor quality flora and is more typical to that of a spoil heap and not a shallow valley that might be expected.

The open cast operations is possibly the reason for inputs of chloride seeps and point flows entering the Normanton Brook. The degredation of the water environment will be better understood over a period of academic examination.

HW 4th December 2017.

Notes

1

Shed built c. 1989/1991 over shaft for pumping water for management of flow of water from the outcrop towards mines that were still operational at the time.

 notes1

 

2. notes2

Twin Winding Houses. These were built in 1928 (date stone on building) replacing an earlier building.

3

Blackwell Colliery was and still is part of the large village of South Normanton. The mine was originally sunk in the 19th century. The area prior to that point was mainly a farming area. In the village a few miners lived working in small pits that supplied coal to the local area (mining in the area was taking place from at least the 14th century) and framework knitters. Each of the groups had its own traditions and culture, mixing rarely with the other group and even less with the farming community. The knitters, or shiners as they were known from the state of their trouser seats after a 14 hour day sitting at their machines.

South Normanton took on its existing character after the opening of ‘A Winning’ colliery in 1871 and ‘B Winning’ in 1875, by the Blackwell Colliery Company. By the 1881’s ‘A Winning’ had the largest output of coal in Derbyshire and employed around 500 men. Streets of terraced houses were built to accommodate the growing population which saw an increase from 1812 in 1871 to 3205 in 1881 and this trend continued until the 1930’s.

4

Taken from ‘fionn.org.uk’

Collieries Closed in 1968: In February 1968Alfreton colliery (North Derbyshire) sunk in 1885/86 by theBlackwell Colliery Co as their ‘C Winning’, was closed after 82 years.
The pit was located just to the north of Alfreton Town off the road to South Normanton.
The shafts were 15ft (4.57m) dia to 153 yds (140m) to Deep Soft. 76 yds (69.5m)
Cast iron tubbing was installed through the water-bearing strata then 9” (0.23m) brickwork below.
Drift at 1in6 down to Deep Hard. Winder 2 cylinders, 30” (0.76m) x 5 ft (1.52m) stroke, flat drum 18 ft (5.49m) dia.
Walker Guibal fan 24 ft (7.31m) dia x 8 ft (2.44m) wide.
Endless rope haulage driven from surface.
No1 shaft was deepened to Low Main at 246 yards 2’ 6” (225.7m) in 1957. Shaft 251 yards (230m) deep.

Highest manpower was 964 in 1951 and highest output 411,643 tons in 1963-1964.
Seams worked were

  • Deep Soft seam, bat 6” (0.15m), coal 3’ 6” (1.07m), bat 5” (0.13m), coal 5” (0.12m), bat 9” (0.23m) seam opened by stall work 1887/92-1934, reopened 1942-1946, conveyor panel work, reopened again 1950-24/7/1953, certain areas were wet working.
  • Deep Hard seam, 3’ 6” (1.07m) opened from stone heads from Deep Soft, approx 20 yards (18.5m) above, 1892-30/6/1946, and –1960. There was a Rickett gate from west to pit bottom. Pipes to water lodge in Low main via drift from Deep Soft to Low Main pit bottom.

Seam worked out.

  • Low Main or Tupton seam, coal 4’ 3” (1.30m) opened from shaft pillar 1900-19/2/1952 as stall work up to 1930s then conveyor panel work and reopened 1954-27/2/1957 to work the barrier to Birchwood and also attempted to work the barrier to Shirland, exhaustion of reserves.
  • Threequarter seam, 2’ 3” (0.69m) opened by cross measures drifting from Low Main 1938-6/1/1967, seam abandoned, uneconomical.
  • Yard seam, coal 3’ 0” (0.91m), abandoned 23/2/1968.
    Colliery closed.

The pit was fairly isolated from old pits the nearest being old Carnfield to the east and Cotes Park to the southeast and 3 old pits to the southwest including Damstead.
Four identical Mather and Platt pumps at 200 gpm with two of the pumps running per 24 hours make of water 288,000 gals per day. Total make was from all seams worked. Water made underground pumped to the surface and after closure flowed through to A Winningmanpower

ManpowerBlackwell Colliery Co:

  • 1894: 445 Deep Soft, 61 Deep Hard, 133 s/f
  • 1895: 409 DS, 126 s/f, 55 Deep Hard, 15 s/f
  • 1896: 430 DS, 141 s/f, 80 DH, 29 s/f
  • 1897: 385 DS, 85 s/f, 90 DH, 27 s/f
  • 1898: 344 DS, 69 s/f, 88 DH, 11 s/f
  • 1899: 282 DS, 74 s/f, 105 DH, 47 s/f
  • 1900: 269 DS, 104 s/f, 126 DH, 13 s/f
  • 1901: 258 DS, 88 s/f, 156 DH, 22 s/f
  • 1902: 280 DS, 106 s/f, 175 DH, 15 s/f
  • 1903: 490 DS and DH, 130 s/f
  • 1904: 548 DS, DH, 147 s/f
  • 1905: 540 DS, DH, 130 s/f
  • 1906: 243 DS, 62 s/f, 251 DH, 41 s/f
  • 1907: 196 DS, 59 s/f, 245 DH, 46 s/f
  • 1908: 223 DS, 65 s/f, 257 DH, 57 s/f
  • 1909: 229 DS, 70 s/f, 253 DH, 55 s/f
  • 1910: 229 DS, 255 DH, 128 s/f
  • 1911: 229 DS, 246 DH, 113 s/f
  • 1912: 214 DS, 237 DH, 121 s/f
  • 1913: 495 DS, DH, 127 s/f
  • 1914: 504 DS, DH, 124 s/f
  • 1915: 495 DS, DS, 115 s/f
  • 1916: 520 DS, DH, 123 s/f
  • 1917: 479 DS, DH, 123 s/f
  • 1918: 492 DS, DH and Low Main, 137 s/f
  • 1919: 561 DS, DH, LM, 166 s/f
  • 1920: 653 DS, DH, LM, 159 s/f
  • 1921: 681 DS, DH, LM, 150 s/f
  • 1922: 773 DS, DH, LM, 178 s/f
  • 1923: 845 DS, DH, LM, 176 s/f
  • 1924: 817 DS, DH, LM, 171 s/f
  • 1925: 735 DS, DH, LM, 177 s/f
  • 1926: 664 DS, DH, LM, 152 s/f
  • 1927: 722 DS, DH, LM, 171 s/f
  • 1928: 670 DS, DH, LM, 174 s/f
  • 1929: 688 DS, DH, LM, 186 s/f
  • 1930: 658 DS, DH, LM, 183 s/f
  • 1931: 640 DS, DH, LM, 179 s/f
  • 1932: 657 DS, DH, LM, 163 s/f
  • 1933: 704 DS, DH, LM, 172 s/f
  • 1934: 689 DS, DH, LM, 166 s/f
  • 1935: 699 DS, DH, LM, 170 s/f
  • 1936: 716 Deep Hard, Low Main, 160 s/f
  • 1937: 712 DH, LM, 157 s/f
  • 1938: 746 DH, LM, 168 s/f
  • 1939: 755 DH, LM, 165 s/f
  • 1940: 766 DH, LM and Threequarter, 163 s/f
  • 1941: 733 DH, LM, Threequarter, 176 s/f
  • 1942: 778, DS, DH, LM, ¾, 187 s/f
  • 1943: 754 DS, DH, LM, ¾, 179 s/f
  • 1944NH and B Collieries Ltd: 795 DS, DH, LM, ¾, 196 s/f
  • 1945: 790 DS, DH, LM, ¾, 201 s/f
  • 1946: 740 DS, DS, DH, LM, ¾, 205 s/f.

Tonnages and Manpower under NCBNo4 Area EMD:

  • 1947: 315,369 tons, 921men
  • 1948: 329,567 tons, 939 men
  • 1949: 336,411 tons, 950 men
  • 1950: 341,073 tons, 941 men
  • 1951: 380,778 tons, 964 men (max)
  • 1952: 362,967 tons, 956 men
  • 1953: 400,946 tons, 945 men
  • 1954: 364, 979 tons, 954 men
  • 1955: 375,248 tons, 942 men
  • 1956: 335,681 tons, 900 men
  • 1957: 303,968 tons, 880 men
  • 1958: 320,167 tons, 874 men
  • 1959: 321,474 tons, 858 men
  • 1960: 324,051 tons, 818 men
  • 1961: 342,526 tons, 793 men
  • 1962: 387,139 tons, 774 men
  • 1963/64411,643 tons (max), 774 men
  • 1964/65: 387,001 tons, 745 men
  • 1965/66: 344.860, 713 men
  • 1966/67: 353,786 tons, 652 men
  • North Derbyshire 1967/68: 193,009 tons, 158 men.
    Production ceased February 1968.

Agents:

  • J Alfred Longden (16 Service cert)
  • Maurice Deacon Agent
  • John T Todd Agent -1923
  • Jack L Merry (542) Agent 1923-1926
  • CR Ellis Agent 1926-1928
  • Jack L Merry (542) Agent 1928-1946.

Sub-Area Managers / Group Managers:

  • Jack W Smalley (3722) Group Manager

Managers for Alfreton:

  • J Alfred Longden (16 service cert) and Agent
  • Percy Muschamp (101 c) 1885–1890
  • Jeremiah Rhodes (720) 1891-1909
  • George AB Millar (87) 1909-1922
  • RJ Cunliffe (446) 1923
  • Jack L Merry (542) Manager 1923-1927
  • Tom L Nicholson (1856) 1928-1958 and Eric G Sellars (3000) 1958-1963 (transferred from Cotes Park, transferred to A Winning)
  • Joe A Rodgers (4226) 1963-1967 (promoted from Swanwick, temporarily at Teversal, transferred to Westthorpe)
  • Jim S Dodd (5803) 1967-1968 (promoted from Deputy Manager Ormonde).

Undermanagers for Alfreton:

  • Jos Draycot (421c)
  • GB Ball (2nd)
  • IJ Cunliffe (2nd)
  • Tom L Nicholson (1856) -1928 (promoted to Manager)
  • A Bishop (2506)
  • E Watts (2nd)
  • Sid Vardy (4647) (previously Area Mechanization Engineer No4 Area, 1950-, promoted to Manager Shirland 1956)
  • F Gregory (2nd)
  • Jack W Smalley (3722) (promoted to Manager Cotes Park)
  • Jack F Dodd (4495).

Surveyors included: …

  • Richard (Dick) TM Lamb (2191) 1/6/1952-30/6/1957 (promoted from Kirkby, transferred to Planning dept)
  • Denis Smith (3025) 1/7/1957-6/4/1968 (transferred to Arkwright on closure).

Fatal accidents Alfreton: included

  • William McKinley (18) fall of roof 21/1/1892
  • Thomas Meakin (30) caught in machinery on the surface 2/8/1894
  • Aaron Severn (45) fall of roof 29/9/1894
  • died 30/9/1894
  • John Calladine (25) fall of roof 27/4/1898
  • Mathew Whyld (26) fall of roof 17/10/1899, died 5/12/1899
  • George William Sills (25) fall of roof 2/9/1904
  • Samuel Hickman (42) fall of roof 18/11/1904, died 1/12/1904
  • William Painter (36) crushed by tubs 1/11/1906, died 10/11/1906
  • Roland Hill (14) crushed by tubs 10/11/1910, died 24/12/1910
  • Herbert Harrison (28) crushed by a wagon on the surface 14/11/1911
  • Edgar Frearson (39) fall of roof 31/5/1913
  • William Bates (38) fall of roof 14/10/1913
  • William Stirland Elliott (14) crushed by tubs 16/3/1914
  • George Wright (32) ? 21/9/1922
  • Reginald H Allsop (14) crushed by wagons on the surface 4/6/1923
  • William H Simmons (56) fall of roof 28/1/1926
  • William Watson Hanson (56) fall of roof 25/8/1930, died 8/9/1930
  • William Wood (31) accident in 1931, died -/7/1932
  • Douglas Johnson (45) injured 13/8/1925, goitre, died 24/6/1933
  • Alec Grant (41) fall of coal 8/2/1937, died 1/3/1937
  • George Henry Holmes (46) fall of roof 18/1/1939
  • Thomas Moakes (58) fell over and injured himself 19/3/1941, died 5/4/1941
  • George William Hogg (35) fell down the shaft 19/12/1943
  • George William Belcher (?) run over by tubs 8/8/1944
  • Frank Chapman (35)? 12/6/1946
  • Alan Calligan (23)? 28/5/1948
  • Henry James Newman (38) fall of roof 2/9/1948, died 8/9/1948
  • Harold Greaves (56) crushed by a conveyor 12/4/1966.

Author: admin

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